Technical guides and animations on the ADA and ABA StandardsThe U.S. Access Board has launched new online guides on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Standards and the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) Accessibility Standards. This web-based material features illustrated technical guides that explain and clarify requirements of the ADA and ABA standards, answer common questions, and offer best practice recommendations. It also includes a series of animations on various subjects covered by the standards.

"The Board is very excited to offer this series of technical guides and animations to help users understand the requirements of the ADA and ABA Standards and how they can be met," states Access Board Member Michael Graves, FAIA. "As a practicing architect, I know from experience how valuable this type of guidance is in following the standards and ensuring accessibility."

The initial installment of the guide covers the first three chapters of the standards, including application and use of the standards (Chapter 1), scoping in new construction, alterations, and additions (Chapter 2), and basic "building block" technical provisions (Chapter 3). Guides covering other sections of the standards will be released at a later date. The supplementary animations, which range in length from 6 to 10 minutes, address wheelchair maneuvering, doors and entrances, and accessible toilet and bathing facilities.

"These new resources not only explain requirements in the standards but also demonstrate their rationale," notes Graves. "Knowing the 'whys' behind various provisions is key to understanding what accessibility means and how best to achieve it."

The Guide to the ADA Standards covers design requirements that apply to places of public accommodation, commercial facilities, and state and local government facilities subject to the ADA in new construction, alterations, and additions. The Guide to the ABA Standards addresses similar standards that apply under the ABA to facilities that are designed, constructed, altered, or leased with federal funds.

Future installments to the guides will be published as they become available. Users can sign-up to receive email updates on the release of new technical guides in the series.

See the story behind the disability rights action in Lisbon Portugal that has gone viral from  Lisboa (In)Acessível.


Staged in the Duke of Saldanha Plaza in Lisbon this bold action went on to become a meme gone viral. Parabens Portugal!
 

From May 14 - 23, 2014 I will be traveling through Nepal providing technical assistance to the tourism industry on accommodating travelers with disabilities. I wanted to find our a little more about disability culture in Nepal. This post features a dancer who is also an amputee Roma Neupane.


Roma Neupane 2.jpg
Part 1:

 

Part 2

:

Interview:
 

Using Brazil's first national study on domestic tourism by travelers with disabilities this address looks at some preliminary points to making the PETAR region truly aFAC.verso.Eldorado.jpg destination for all. It was my privilege to be invited to present at a conference on disability, development, and citizenship in Brazil. The conference site, Eldourado in the interior of São Paulo state sits in the Upper Ribeira River Ecological Park (PETAR) which is a world patrimony site.


The geology is formed by the collision of massive tectonic plates making the surface highly fractured. Called karst he area is riddled with caves. In fact, it contains South America's largest network of caves. One objective of the conference is to develop accessibility for the caves as tourist destinations.

Yet the region is also culturally unique. It is one o the poorest and least developed regions of Brazil. Its also home to maroons or quilimbos - communities historically formed by former slaves of African descent. 

This is a region that can truly benefit from the innovative approach to social and economic development that is Inclusive Tourism and Inclusive Development.
 

Here is the text of the uncaptioned video above:

 

This presentation also exists in Portuguese and Spanish translation.

Turismo Inclusivo para Eldourado y la PETAR: Primeros Pasos



http://www.slideshare.net/srains/petar-spanish

We cread in Ronny Blaschke's article:

"In our country, there are no disabled people." This is a quote attributed to Soviet communist party leader Leonid Breschnev in the 1980s.

The 1980 Summer Olympic Games took place in Moscow and the Soviet Union simply refused to organize the Paralympics, which were then held in Arnhem, Netherlands.

Now in 2014, the Russian organizers see things differently, they are planning a ten-day cosmopolitan sports festival with 600 athletes from 45 nations.

But can the Paralympics help bring a marginalized group in Russia's population into the national spotlight?

Source: http://www.dw.de/sochi-paralympic-games-highlight-russian-discrimination/a-17479262

To find out more read the in-depth study by Human Rights Watch:

http://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/reports/russia0913_ForUpload.pdf


As we have been been saying daily since Brazil won the right to host the FIFA World Cup and the Olympic/Paralympic Games, the world is turning its attention to Brazil with unrelenting scrutiny. This article from the New York Times is one of a series of exposés that will appear in the international press in the lead up to the Rio 2016 Games:


"Archaeologists are exposing the foundations of our unequal society while we are witnessing a perverse attempt to remake the city into something resembling Miami or Dubai," said Cláudio Lima Castro, an architect and scholar of urban planning. "We're losing an opportunity to focus in detail on our past, and maybe even learn from it."


In the spirit of Olympic and Paralympic legacy, VisitEngland today launches a national marketing campaign aimed at championing and improving accessible tourism in England, a sector worth over £2billion a year* to the domestic tourism industry, with strong growth potential. The national tourist board has worked with a number of destinations and the Disabled Persons Railcard to develop exciting guides highlighting fantastic and accessible tourism experiences across the country. The Access for All Campaign aims to position England as a leading destination for accessible tourism.

The campaign, funded by £100,000 from the Government's Regional Growth Fund (RGF) plus contributions from partners, is a cost-effective way for selected English destinations to showcase their accessible tourism businesses and attract more visits from disabled travellers and others with access needs, and their companions.

Each destination has selected top class accommodation and attractions which have then been through an Access for All programme developed by VisitEngland to ensure they're delivering the highest standard of access for visitors. These places to stay and visit are featured in a series of local guides that highlight key attributes of the destination as well as promoting it as access friendly. The four destinations involved in the campaign are listed below, with a few highlights of what is on offer:

• Leicestershire - Situated in the heart of the country, Leicestershire has been welcoming visitors for more than 2,000 years - everyone from Roman armies to medieval Kings and Queens. Visitors to the city and county can explore its unique heritage in a new accessible package, Stay Play Explore Glorious Heritage. Visit the Bosworth Battlefield Heritage Centre, site of the dramatic conclusion to the Wars of the Roses, where Richard III lost his life and Henry Tudor was crowned king. From here, visit the Richard III exhibition at Leicester's Guildhall to continue your discovery of this intriguing monarch, before taking afternoon tea at The Belmont Hotel. The National Brewery Centre makes a perfect pit stop, and celebrates the history, art and fun of brewing.  Finally, see the National Memorial Arboretum and Snibston Discovery Museum, the largest science and technology museum in the East Midlands. The Stay Play Explore Glorious Heritage package includes entry to a choice of three out of five attractions and an overnight stay at the 4-star Hinckley Island Hotel for just £109. Each site has completed VisitEngland's Access for All programme and offers excellent facilities and access.

• NewcastleGateshead - A must-see for visitors to NewcastleGateshead is the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, with its four accessible gallery spaces, it has an ever-changing programme of exhibitions. NewcastleGateshead is home to Europe's largest shopping and leisure centre, intu Metrocentre which offers a range of services for visitors with accessibility needs, including Shopmobility, assisted changing facilities, and free wheelchair hire. The city is also home to one of the world's premier music venues, Sage Gateshead. This 'Access for All' award-winning venue's extensive access facilities include level access throughout, hearing loop systems, 35 accessible toilets and monitored light levels in all areas.  At the end of a long day, head back to the Hilton Newcastle Gateshead, an award-winning hotel set on the historic Quayside with fantastic views over the River Tyne. There are twelve accessible guest rooms, including three Executive rooms which have access to a private lounge and panoramic views of the city.

• Brighton - Bustling seaside destination Brighton & Hove has a jam-packed cultural calendar, making it a top spot for a seaside break. Take in Brighton's art culture with visits to the Brighton Museum and Art Gallery and the Hove Museum & Art Gallery. Heritage fans can visit Brighton's spectacular seaside palace, the Royal Pavilion, with easy access throughout the ground floor, or visit the nearby Preston Manor, a delightful Edwardian country house with the ground floor, basement and walled garden accessible for all visitors. Thistle Brighton, Jurys Inn and Hilton Brighton Metropole have all been through VisitEngland's Access for All programme and feature guest rooms accessible for wheelchair users and visually or hearing impaired guests.  VisitBrighton offers downloadable factsheets about access in the city and a map showing step free access to the main hotels and attractions, and the locations of dropped kerbs around the city.

• Bath - For centuries, Bath has enchanted everyone from ancient Romans to Jane Austen and it continues to offer everything required for a perfect weekend break: from heritage sites and contemporary culture to top hotels and excellent food. You can take in the atmosphere and impressive architecture on a fully personalised tour with Bath Parade Guides. Renovations to The Roman Baths - one of the wonders of Roman England - have made the Baths accessible for all, and include a lift to the lower level museum, level access, and ramps across ancient Roman obstacles. The Bath for Everyone offer for £74.50 will transport you to the city's origins and ensure you get to know the best of Bath. Take in Bath's culture and visit the Fashion Museum, housed in the impressive 18th century Assembly Rooms. All floors are accessible and equipped with ramps, a lift and level access throughout. Victoria Art Gallery is home to a plethora of international artists from the 15th century to the present day. Make a weekend of it with a stay at the Holiday Inn Express, where seven purpose-built accessible guest rooms have been designed to suit a variety of access needs.

James Berresford, chief executive of VisitEngland said: "England is a very accessible destination with plenty on offer for everyone. This is a wonderful opportunity to showcase these particular locations as shining examples of best practice; to build on the legacy of the 2012 Paralympic Games and encourage tourism businesses to make the most of the accessible tourism market, which has enormous potential for growth. Whether exploring the wonders of Roman England in Bath, enjoying a vibrant seaside break in Brighton, journeying through Leicestershire's heritage, or taking in the bustle of NewcastleGateshead, with these guides you can enjoy a fantastic holiday and feel confident that the places you visit are working hard to meet your access needs."

Download the guides from the 4th March in either PDF, large print Word or audio format from  VisitEngland.com/accessforall.  A limited number of printed copies are available for those who cannot access the guides online. Email qad@VisitEngland.org or call 0207 578 1454.


Source: http://www.whatson-greentourism.co.uk/visitengland-launches-national-marketing-campaign-to-promote-accessible-tourism/

Candace Cable in Armenia

Candace Cable in Armenia spreading the word about living with disabilities.

 

True Grit - The 2014 Paralympics

"The idea of 'Sport Doesn't Care' is that sport is the great leveler," says Carlo Cavallone, ecd at 72andSunny in Amsterdam, of his agency's hard-hitting 90-second spot for Paralympics sponsor Samsung. 


 "Abled and other-abled athletes are exactly the same when it comes to competing," he tells AdFreak. "Paralympic athletes don't go to the games because they want to make a statement about their disability; they go because they want to win a medal. This is often missed in the communication about this event." 

 Source: http://www.adweek.com/adfreak/samsung-goes-real-raw-and-pitiless-gritty-paralympics-ad-156018

Traveling in Barbados

From The Barbados Advocate:


The Barbados Council for the Disabled (BCD) and its initiative, the Fully Accessible Barbados (FAB) programme, are affording persons with disabilities who are visiting the island an opportunity to experience Barbados beyond the decks of their cruise liners.

Hence other organisations, places of interests and businesses are being encouraged to become accessible.

Co-ordinator and Founder of the Boca Area Post Polio Group, Maureen Sinkule, said that Barbados' having the FAB programme is "fabulous".

She said, "So many times people think that people with disabilities don't have money to spend, not that I do, but I'm just saying, if you can get us there, we can spend the money, but if we can't get there, we can't spend money. So this is fabulous. This is fabulous that you have such a vehicle and such wonderful people to work with."

And her refrain was chanted by other local and visiting persons with disabilities interviewed on Wednesday in the Bridgetown Port, "The disabled have money to spend too," and they want opportunities to spend it.

Full story:
http://www.barbadosadvocate.com/newsitem.asp?more=local&NewsID=34696

Although it is not the point of this PSA here is proof that we see the world differently from a wheelchair.


Notice how this billboard is designed to communicate something entirely different to children, and by extension, those at wheelchair height. The process uses a lenticular lense to direct the image at a specific height. It raises the question. "What else do people of short stature pick up about the world that slips past others?"

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TSA Film

Soft Wheels

O Comitê de Deficiência e Acessibilidade da Associação Brasileira de Antropologia convida para a apresentação de trabalhos e posters no GRUPO DE TRABALHO: ETNOGRAFIAS DA DEFICIÊNCIA, na 29ª Reunião Brasileira de Antropologia, em Natal, de 03 a 06 de agosto de 2014. 

083. Etnografias da Deficiência

Coordenadores: Debora Diniz (Universidade de Brasília), Adriana Dias (COMITÊ DEF ACESSIBILIDADE/AAA/UNICAMP)

A questão da deficiência sempre esteve presente na história da civilização, mas foi somente nas últimas décadas que as pessoas com deficiência passaram a se narrarem e a se constituírem como sujeitos de direitos humanos. Isso permitiu o surgimento, nas Ciências Humanas e Sociais, dos Estudos sobre Deficiência, um campo de investigação cuja proposta central é apreender os diferentes sentidos e significados da categoria deficiência em suas relações históricas e sociais e a articulação com outras categorias de análise, como o gênero, a classe, a raça/etnia, a sexualidade, dentre outras. Os debates que a envolvem incluem questões, diversas, transversais e interdisciplinares, tais como os desafios da formulação, execução e avaliação de políticas públicas para pessoas com deficiência, a inclusão escolar, o acesso ao mercado de trabalho, o combate e enfrentamento ao capacitismo, o suporte de vida independente, o incentivo aos esportes paraolímpicos, a participação em espetáculos de dança, o usufruto dos direitos sexuais e reprodutivos, entre outros. Neste GT almejamos trabalhos que possam criar uma interlocução com temas diversos em torno da deficiência, a partir do uso do método etnográfico e à luz de uma perspectiva antropológica focada nos Estudos sobre Deficiência, permitindo um debate mais intenso acerca da diversidade teórica desse campo de estudos.

http://www.29rba.abant.org.br/inscricoes

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