Recently in Career & Continuing Education Category

1.0  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 

Mapping occupation, skills needs and training content

 

1. Accessible tourism training should take into account the context of training, the

trainee's prior qualifications, knowledge and experience, the level of the training to be

delivered and visitors' specific access requirements.

2. If a visitor experience is to be truly accessible then all elements of the supply chain or

customer journey must be accessible. As a result, a person's place in the tourism

value chain is less important for determining skills and training needs than the role that

this person fulfils in the business.

3. Thus, skills needs and training provision must differentiate between different skills

levels (basic, in-depth) and different occupational roles (Managers with / without

customer contact, frontline staff, others (including technical specialists).

4. Training content and learning outcomes should include Knowledge of disabilities /

types of disability and access requirements, Barriers to accessibility & Design for All,

Strategic development of accessibility in business, Principles of effective customer

service, Proper etiquette for dealing with PwD, Recognising and responding

appropriately to people using personal supports and Service animals and assistive

technology

5. There are wide differences in accessible tourism content in mainstream tourism and

hospitality training curricula across the EU.

6. On the whole, the level of awareness and qualifications of tourism services providers

is inadequate to address the needs of people with disabilities. There is an urgent need

to promote an understanding of accessibility before it is possible to persuade

businesses to take up training.

7. Existing training is overwhelmingly directed towards continuing vocational educational

training (VET). Current training provisions are often provided on a non-permanent

basis or reach too few individuals to have an effective impact on the accessible

tourism services.

8. Overall, NGOs are the most active organisations delivering accessibility training for

businesses across Europe. NGOs have developed the training in partnership with

tourism organisations, tourism boards or businesses in order to feed in the sector

knowledge.

9. The standard methods of delivering formal training are online and traditional

classroom-based training. Some training providers1 have developed "blended-learning

programme" or "b-learning". Direct involvement with people with disabilities during

training has the greatest level of impact and duration. However, it is also indirectly

mentioned as a barrier for businesses to take up the training.

10. A majority of courses are directed to frontline staff. However, there is a recognition that 

it is important to reach managers for the training to have a more long-lasting impact. 

11. Most training introduces introductory-level skills as business conditions often require a 

fast delivery of training which is focused on giving results in the daily work of every 

staff member.

12. Motor and sensory impairments rank among the accessibility requirements most often 

addressed in the training.


Existing demand for accessible tourism training


13. SMEs in the tourism sector make less use of formal training than large enterprises -

whether for managers or staff - due to limited financial resources, limited time and 

difficulties in accessing training courses locally. Informal training and "on the-job" 

experiences are important tools to enhance staff skills among SMEs.

14. Thus, training should not be limited to structured and top-down approaches to learning

and may take the form of "awareness raising" which is less formal and has broader 

appeal to SMEs.

15. While a number of certificates in accessibility training exist across Europe, these do 

not give academic credits and most qualifications are not recognised in the wider 

tourism sector. 

16. In several Member States there is growing awareness of the importance of the 

accessibility market. Awareness may be influenced by government anti-discrimination 

policies or accessibility may be adopted is part of the strategic development of a 

country's or region's tourism products. The maturity of a tourism destination does not 

seem to have any bearing on the availability of courses or the uptake of accessibility. 

Gaps in training provision and the role of EU projects

17. Key gaps in the existing training landscape include a gap in the actual 

availability/provision of training, a gap in the development of the business case for 

training and a gap in evaluating the impact of training on customers, staff and 

businesses.

18. The role of EU-projects to remedy the gap in the availability of accessible tourism 

training has so far been rather limited. EU funded projects have focused on 

establishing a basic understanding about the target of training initiatives, the main 

actors who need to be trained (management, staff and different occupational roles) 

and appropriate training tools, methods and curricula. The main achievement of most 

of these projects lies in the awareness raised among the participants and the relevant 

stakeholders.

19. At the same time, EU projects so far have suffered from low transferability and weak 

dissemination. Accordingly their efforts have not been exploited in a coordinated way. 

The widespread lack of continuity or uptake of training suggests some projects were 

not sufficiently embedded in the tourism sector at an institutional level. Many of these 

EU funded projects were pilot projects with very few participants.


Drivers of supply/demand for training


20. Key factors that influence the supply of training provisions are tourism policy and

legislation. In those Member States where accessibility has a strategic role in the

development of tourism products there seem to be a higher number of available

training courses. Legislation seem to encourage the proliferation of training courses

(as well as uptake), at least where this legislation is being properly enforced.

21. The greatest barrier to training is the lack of awareness of accessibility and the lack of

a convincing business case for accessibility training. Tourism businesses have little

incentive to engage in training for accessibility when this is a poorly understood

market. The challenge seems to consist in making a convincing business case for

training, structuring the market (demand and supply) for training and spreading

awareness of successful business practices by peers.

22. A top-down process of awareness for accessibility seems to favour provision of

training courses. Business and trade associations must be fully integrated in efforts to

develop an accessible tourism business case.

23. Key actors within organisations such as tourism boards, but also individual businesses

or service providers can act as "champions", actively promoting training as an integral

part of accessibility strategies.


Recommendations


24. There is a strong case for a recognised European certificate in the area of Accessible

Tourism. The field is still sufficiently "young" for such a transferable qualification to be

developed, yet without one, different national variations may appear, which could

entail difficulties in the coming years regarding mutual recognition in different EU

Member States.

25. Development of such a standard would help address both supply side barriers (by

providing a structure to the market for accessible training provision) and some of the

demand side challenges (by defining accessible tourism skills as a transferrable and

recognised skill).

26. The standard would not require the design of specialised accessible tourism training

modules. Rather, the required skills (as defined in section 3 of his report) could be

integrated into existing tourism qualification. This would certainly be the case for the

basic skills per occupational group defined in section 3 with more in-depth training

being provided in separate modules focused exclusively on accessible tourism

27. A full list of recommendations is presented in section 7 of the full report which is at:

http://www.t-guide.eu/resources/study-c-final-report_skills_ec_mastercopy_for-printing_final.pdf?i=t-guide

Below is the European report "Mapping of Skills and Training needs to improve accessible tourism services". 


The report includes all findings of the research and data collection, the full analysis of results and a set of conclusions and recommendations. To facilitate dissemination, all country level data and the 20 case study reports my be downloaded here:http://www.accessibletourism.org/?i=enat.en.reports.1620 

 Authored for the European Commission by Pierre Hausemer, Ivor Ambrose, Kei Ito and Monika Auzinger. 

The study is downloadable as PDF here: http://www.t-guide.eu/resources/study-c-final-report_skills_ec_mastercopy_for-printing_final.pdf?i=t-guide

A major part of the Research Study commissioned in 2013 by the European Commission and awarded to VVAENAT and3s Research, involved the preparation of 20 Case Studies, examining accessible tourism training programmes and projects in Europe and abroad.

The selected Case Studies can be regarded as examples of good practice in vocational education and training, although certain weaknesses are also identified, where appropriate.

On the ENAT website the following case studies may be downloaded:

List of Skills and Training Case Studies

  1. ABTA, United Kingdom

  2. ETCAATS, EU Training Project, Sweden
  3. Perfil - Psicologia e Trabalho, Portugal
  4. SCANDIC Hotels, Sweden
  5. Kéroul
 Welcoming Ways, Canada
  6. ATHENA EU Training Project, Czech Republic
  7. Via Libre, Spain
  8. VisitEngland, United Kingdom
  9. People 1st, Welcome All. United Kingdom 

  10. PEOPLECERT, Greece
  11. COIN, Italy
  12. HERMES Airports, Cyprus
  13. Cluster for Accessible Tourism, Bulgaria
  14. Lousã, Accessible Tourism Destination, Portugal
  15. TACTALL EU Training Project, Spain
  16. Ministry of Tourism, Ontario, Canada

  17. Disney Corporation, France
  18. VisitFlanders' Accessibility Training, Belgium
  19. Barrier-Free Destinations, Germany
  20. EU Funded Training Projects
Source:

The Business Benefits of Universal Design

My first international adventure was an amazing one. Elaine Keane is an occupational therapist that has opened, Crecer, a free clinic in Ecuador. Six occupational therapy students, six physical therapy students, and our professors ventured to Ecuador to provide services at Elaine's free clinic along with other sites in the area, including an adult day care, nursing home, and orphanage.


10472262_894996070515379_3102662016851525399_n.jpg

Throughout the week, the OT and PT students took over the caseload at Crecer Centro de Rehabilitación, Educación, Capacitación, Estudios y Recursos, Inc. My group, composed of two OT and two PT students, saw clients pediatric to adult. One of our successful cotreat sessions was with a young boy with spastic cerebral palsy. The PT student held the boy on his knee focusing on breaking up his tone with proper positioning while I completed a tabletop activity with the boy encouraging him to bring his hands to midline while completing fine motor tasks. Our class also worked with an adult who suffered a TBI after a fall at his electrical job. One group worked on his mathematical skills by creating a mock store and asking him to purchase items and calculate the correct change. Another group arranged the therapy room to mimic his electrician job site. The client demonstrated what his job entails as the OT and PT students noted areas that needed improvement before he is able to return to his job.

At FUNHI, the adult day care, we had a sports day playing adapted versions of volleyball, soccer, hockey, and ring toss. We also celebrated a Quinceanera with the clients. We took this opportunity to create birthday cards with those who hoped to improve their fine motor skills. Those who needed to improve range of motion helped us decorate the room with crepe paper and balloons.

The Asilo orphanage and nursing home were less focused on individual therapy sessions and more so aimed at serving the large population in a volunteer aspect. The girls at the orphanage ranged from 18 months to 14 years old. From painting nails to making balloon animals, the girls had a blast and the students didn't want to leave. At the nursing home we first helped shower the residents each morning. It was a very humbling experience. In the afternoon we had a fiesta with the residents, which included balloon games, jewelry making, and a lot of dancing.

The trip wasn't all about work. We had plenty of fun- zip lining upside down in the Andes Mountains, white water rafting in intertubes, relaxing in the hot springs heated by volcanoes, learning how chocolate is made, going to a butterfly house, orchid tour, tasting guinea pig, and sightseeing. I thoroughly enjoyed my first traveling experience and can't wait for traveling opportunities in the future.


Signs Restaurant

Signs Restaurant is staffed with deaf servers, and is now open for business in Toronto's busy Yonge and Wellesley area. The restaurant is the first project of its kind in Canada.

"I think it's super inspiring," says Christine Nelson from the Bob Rumball Centre for the Deaf. "On behalf of the whole community we're thrilled to see something like this take place."

Owner Anjan Manikumar says he got the inspiration for Signs while working in a Markham restaurant as a server. He had a deaf customer who had to order by pointing to the menu. "I felt he wasn't getting the service he deserved," says Manikumar. "He wasn't getting the personal touch."


Full article:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/signs-restaurant-introduces-diners-to-sign-language-1.2722538?cmp=fbtl


Technical guides and animations on the ADA and ABA StandardsThe U.S. Access Board has launched new online guides on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Standards and the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) Accessibility Standards. This web-based material features illustrated technical guides that explain and clarify requirements of the ADA and ABA standards, answer common questions, and offer best practice recommendations. It also includes a series of animations on various subjects covered by the standards.

"The Board is very excited to offer this series of technical guides and animations to help users understand the requirements of the ADA and ABA Standards and how they can be met," states Access Board Member Michael Graves, FAIA. "As a practicing architect, I know from experience how valuable this type of guidance is in following the standards and ensuring accessibility."

The initial installment of the guide covers the first three chapters of the standards, including application and use of the standards (Chapter 1), scoping in new construction, alterations, and additions (Chapter 2), and basic "building block" technical provisions (Chapter 3). Guides covering other sections of the standards will be released at a later date. The supplementary animations, which range in length from 6 to 10 minutes, address wheelchair maneuvering, doors and entrances, and accessible toilet and bathing facilities.

"These new resources not only explain requirements in the standards but also demonstrate their rationale," notes Graves. "Knowing the 'whys' behind various provisions is key to understanding what accessibility means and how best to achieve it."

The Guide to the ADA Standards covers design requirements that apply to places of public accommodation, commercial facilities, and state and local government facilities subject to the ADA in new construction, alterations, and additions. The Guide to the ABA Standards addresses similar standards that apply under the ABA to facilities that are designed, constructed, altered, or leased with federal funds.

Future installments to the guides will be published as they become available. Users can sign-up to receive email updates on the release of new technical guides in the series.

Candace Cable in Armenia

Candace Cable in Armenia spreading the word about living with disabilities.

 

Although it is not the point of this PSA here is proof that we see the world differently from a wheelchair.


Notice how this billboard is designed to communicate something entirely different to children, and by extension, those at wheelchair height. The process uses a lenticular lense to direct the image at a specific height. It raises the question. "What else do people of short stature pick up about the world that slips past others?"

)

From Graham Condie:

Would you be able to forward my questionnaire onto some groups of physically disabled people who you know have been on cruises? The deadline for the questionnaire is next Friday (7th February) (GMT).

My questionnaire contains 3 sets of questions on physically disabled peoples' motivations, experiences and opinions of cruises. Most of the questions are only ticking a box and the questionnaire should only take ten minutes.

Please find the questionnaire here: https://www.esurveycreator.com/s/b108a4b

Here is the 2012-2013 report from the 3rd European Parliament of Persons with Disabilities.

Join us on January 29th at 8:30 pm Eastern Time for a Virtual Support Group on travel with a disability. 

 Preregistration is required. Registration is online at this link: http://www.abc-med.com/register-abc-virtual-support-group


What are these virtual discussion groups from ABC Medical?

Here at Leaving Evidence blog Mia Mingus deepens our understanding and gives a name to a phenomenon similar to what Fullbright Scholar Regina Cohen identifies as "atmospheres" in her excellent study of museum accessibility in Brazil.


First from Mia:

There are many ways to describe intimacy.  For example, there's physical intimacy, emotional intimacy, intellectual, political, familial or sexual intimacy.  But, as a physically disabled woman, there is another kind of intimacy I have been struggling to name and describe, what I have been calling "access intimacy".http://leavingevidence.wordpress.com/..

Access intimacy is that elusive, hard to describe feeling when someone else "gets" your access needs.  The kind of eerie comfort that your disabled self feels with someone on a purely access level.  Sometimes it can happen with complete strangers, disabled or not, or sometimes it can be built over years.  It could also be the way your body relaxes and opens up with someone when all your access needs are being met.  It is not dependent on someone having a political understanding of disability, ableism or access.  




Here Regina describes "atmospheres" in context:

Monthly Archives