From GRI for All:


 The United Nations need to include indicators related to inclusion of people with disabilities in its Post-2015 agenda: http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?id=1590#participation


Why indicators on disability should be in the GRI Guidelines:

 

  • People with disabilities are the world's largest minority and most disadvantaged population group. There are more than 1 billion people who are living with disabilities, who represent 15% of the world population. In all regions people with disabilities are disproportionately represented among the world's poorest, and lack equal access to fundamental resources.
  • This figure is increasing through population growth, medical advances and the ageing process, says the World Health Organization (WHO).
  • An estimated 386 million of the world's working-age people have some kind of disability, says the International Labor Organization (ILO). Unemployment among the persons with disabilities is as high as 80 per cent in some countries. By employing people with disabilities, companies could wisely take advantage of the wider range of human talents.
  • People with disabilities are also a large potential customer base, which continues growing, particularly in ageing societies, where any person could experience some kind of disability at some point in his/her lifetime. For instance, in the United Kingdom, 75 per cent of the companies of the FTSE 100 Index on the London Stock Exchange do not meet basic levels of web accessibility, thus missing out on more than $147 million in revenue.

Since its approval in 2006, more than 150 countries have ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Convention is intended as a human rights instrument with an explicit, social development dimension. It adopts a broad categorization of persons with disabilities and reaffirms that all persons with all types of disabilities must enjoy all human rights and fundamental freedoms. It refers to a wide range of areas such as employment, accessibility, education, health, work and employment, living independently, adequate standard of living and social protection, participation in the community, cultural and political life, just to state some topics. Although the UN Convention becomes mandatory and applicable to national legislations for signatories, much work needs to be done for its full implementation. 

http://www.un.org/disabilities/documents/convention/convoptprot-e.pdf


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