India: Disability Rights is Off the Rails

By Javed Abidi:

Like all other years, this year's Railway budget did not bring any cheer for India's 70-100 million people with disabilities, a large number of whom depend on the Railways for their basic mobility needs.

The only difference was that for the first time, the new Railway Minister talked about the substantive issue of accessibility at the stations and in the coaches. However, the discrimination and indignity faced by millions of persons with disabilities trying to use the Railways cannot be addressed by mere pious statements of good intent. The barriers are deep-rooted and systemic.

Let's try and understand what it means for the average person with disability to travel with the Railways.

To begin with, you can't buy the tickets online. The website is not accessible as it does not conform to web content accessibility guidelines despite a Government of India policy mandating so. And even if you are not print-impaired, you 'have to' physically go to the booking counter with your disability certificate in hand to avail yourself of the discount and get a prized seat in that one single accessible coach per train.

The booking counters are not accessible and that one 'accessible' counter for 'special' and 'differently-abled' people (pun intended) is not manned most of the time.

To top it, by the government's own admission, more than 50 per cent of the people with disabilities actually don't have a disability certificate.

Even if you are lucky to have a disability certificate, you are forced to purchase two tickets and to travel with an 'attendant,' never mind if you are totally independent and can actually travel alone.

HURDLES IN STATIONS

To get to the coach is another huge struggle. The way to the platforms is not at all accessible. India is still stuck with the concept of foot over-bridges with a thousand steep steps, and no ramps or lifts. You are therefore left with no choice but to use the same path as the luggage carts -- littered with potholes and garbage.

The concept of 'accessibility' for the Railways has remained limited to one accessible toilet for the entire station. God help you if you urgently need to use one but you are on Platform No. 2 and the 'disabled-friendly' toilet happens to be at the extreme end of the station, beyond Platform No. 7.

It is the same story with all other public facilities such as the drinking water taps, the public telephone booths, and so on.

The worst aspect of the Railways in the modern, 21st century India is the segregated coach for people with disabilities. This 'special' coach for 'differently-abled' people is attached now to almost every long-distance train either at the beginning, immediately after the engine, or towards the very end, right next to the guard. A person with disability doesn't have the same choice as other passengers because all the other coaches are not accessible.

We all know the story of Mahatma Gandhi having been thrown off a first-class carriage in South Africa because of the colour of his skin. I say Gandhiji was lucky. After all, he did manage to get into the coach. I, as a wheelchair user, can't even get inside.

What is needed is a holistic, time-bound action plan with a generous resource allocation. We are not asking for any miracles but there should be a serious start somewhere. I offer a simple three-point agenda to our new Railways Minister: Make the Railways website accessible. Make all A1 category stations fully accessible (stations are categorised by passenger traffic). Make at least one coach accessible in every class of every train. Fix a practical time frame, allocate a decent budget and for God's sake, then just do it!

Source:

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/disability-rights-is-off-the-rails/article4469686.ece

(Javed Abidi is a very disgruntled disabled Indian citizen. He has been a wheelchair user for the last 33 years and yet, is not 'wheelchair-bound'. He keeps travelling around the world as the Global Chair of Disabled People's International (DPI). He is neither 'invalid' nor 'special.' And, he certainly is not 'differently' abled. He travels by train all the time, but only in America and in Europe. At home, in modern India, he cannot. He cannot even get inside them but he wants to. Hence, this piece, in the hope that things will change. He is Convener, Disabled Rights Group (DRG) and Chairperson, DPI.)

Recent Entries

Startling USTA Survey Results Reveal U.S. Entry Process Deters Millions of Visitors
U.S. Entry Process Deters Millions of Visitors=========WASHINGTON, DC., March 19, 2013 (U.S. Travel Association Media Release) - Overseas travelers are…
India: Disability Rights is Off the Rails
By Javed Abidi:Like all other years, this year's Railway budget did not bring any cheer for India's 70-100 million people…
UNWTO: Advancing accessible tourism for all
As the body responsible for promoting and monitoring the implementation of the UNWTO Global Code of Ethics for Tourism, the…
Key Trends That Are Shaping the Brazilian Digital Landscape
ComScore has produced a new study on key trends shaping the Brazilian dgital landscape." called "2013 Brazil Digital Future in…
Grasping the Market Potential of People with Disabilities
A special section from Ability magazine on the market potential of people with disabilities.…
About Agenda 22
From:Disability World In an effort to strengthen the impact of the UN guidelines, ensure that information is disseminated and that local…
Meet Deborah Davis and the Story behind PhotoAbility
Deborah Davis is the co-founder of PUSHliving.com, a travel, leisure and lifestyle enterprise that is also the parent company for…
MarketAbility: Your Guide to the Disability Marketplace
Press Release:TORONTO, MARCH 22, 2013 -- /PRNewswire/ -- eSSENTIAL Accessibility launched a new magazine, MarketAbility: Your Guide to the Disability Marketplace, which caters…